What Not To Do: Learning by Example in the Republic and Gulliver's Travels

dc.contributor.advisorSkerpan-Wheeler, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Keri L.
dc.contributor.committeeMemberRaphael, Rebecca
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-07T17:44:59Z
dc.date.available2012-02-24T10:09:36Z
dc.date.issued2010-12
dc.description.abstractThrough aesthetic techniques, Plato’s The Republic and Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels provide the reader with efferent knowledge, benefitting the reader’s understanding of the entirety of each text. Plato and Swift employ form, characterization, and the theme of vision to challenge readers to find meaning by asking for reader involvement, making the reader an essential part of the text in order for the texts’ lessons to be completed. Additionally, the comprehension of Part IV of Gulliver’s Travels requires attention not only to the tools acquired in Parts I-III, but also to the learning experiences of Republic. These texts are not straightforward arguments for the perfect society, but carefully crafted exercises designed for the reader.
dc.description.departmentEnglish
dc.formatText
dc.format.extent39 pages
dc.format.medium1 file (.pdf)
dc.identifier.citationFitzgerald, K. (2010). What not to do: Learning by example in the Republic and Gulliver's Travels (Unpublished thesis). Texas State University-San Marcos, San Marcos, Texas.
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10877/3168
dc.language.isoen
dc.subjectPlato
dc.subjectSwift
dc.subjectrepublic
dc.subjectGulliver's travels
dc.subjecttransactional
dc.subjectefferent
dc.subjectaesthetic
dc.subjectreading
dc.subjectHonors College
dc.titleWhat Not To Do: Learning by Example in the Republic and Gulliver's Travels
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.departmentHonors College
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglish
thesis.degree.grantorTexas State University-San Marcos

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