The Impact of Advanced Placement and Dual Enrollment Programs on College Graduation

Date
2007-05
Authors
McCauley, David
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Abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to test whether Advanced Placement (AP) and dual enrollment courses for high school students influence the likelihood of enrolled students graduating from a four-year college or university within six years. Method: A total of 3,781 AP and/or dual enrollment students and 2,760 non-AP and non-dual enrollment students were selected for inclusion in the study. A regression analysis was used to test the impact of AP and dual enrollment programs on college graduations while controlling for subject's race, gender, and socioeconomic status. Results: Overall, the results showed that taking an AP or dual enrollment course was a significant factor influencing whether a student graduated from a four-year university or college within six years. High income, female, and Anglo students are also more likely to graduate within six years from a four-year university as compared to low income, male, and minority students. Conclusion: This research study is only a small step in revealing an incentive for high school students and colleges to find ways for students to graduate sooner and become members of the workforce. AP and dual enrollment courses have enabled high school students to become familiar with college expectations and gain college credit, with this familiarization students are more likely to graduate from college within a timely manner.
Description
An Applied Research Project Submitted to the Department of Political Science, Texas State University-San Marcos, in Partial Fulfillment for the Requirements for the Degree of Masters of Public Administration, Spring 2007.
Keywords
advanced placement, dual enrollment, college graduation, Public Administration
Citation
McCauley, D. (2007). The impact of advanced placement and dual enrollment programs on college graduation. Masters of Public Administration, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas.